The Difference Between Obstetricians & Gynecologists: By A Glendale, Queens Dr.

A specialist in obstetrics, which covers every facet of pregnancy from prenatal care through postpartum care, is an obstetrician. Contrary to gynecologists, obstetricians deliver babies. An obstetrician can also offer fertility medications and other treatments to aid in conception. In the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, an obstetrician can also offer advice if you give birth to a premature infant (NICU). An obstetrician will make sure that both you and the unborn child are in good health during your pregnancy. In this article a local Glendale, Queens OBGYN will  give you the complete guide to everything you need to know about female health in 2022.

Obstetricians are also trained to deal with pregnancy issues like:

  • Ectopic pregnancy, in which the fetus develops outside of the uterus
  • Signs of Fetal Distress, in which the fetus is not doing well for a number of different causes.
  • Problems with the placenta
  • Preeclampsia
  • Cesarean delivery

 

An obstetrician can assist you if you need it after giving birth and are struggling with problems like postpartum depression.

GYNECOLOGY

A gynecologist is an expert in looking after a woman’s reproductive health from the start of her first menstruation until post-menopause.

A gynecologist diagnoses and treats any disorders affecting the reproductive system, including those affecting the cervix, uterus, ovaries, fallopian tubes, or vagina. Additionally, gynecologists carry out advised tests such pelvic exams, pap smears, and breast exams. They also carry out tubal ligations and hysterectomies. Additionally, a gynecologist can administer human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccinations to prevent cancer-causing HPV.

In addition to offering advise on reproductive issues, gynecologists can also offer guidance on sexual issues such responsible sexual behavior, contraception, and protection against STDs. Overall, a gynecologist can handle any female reproductive health problem that is unrelated to pregnancy.

To offer patients comprehensive care, many doctors have additional training in both obstetrics and gynecology. They are able to meet the whole range of medical needs of their patients in this way. These doctors are known as OBGYNs.

 

Gynecological symptoms that may require medical attention

Gynecological symptoms can resemble those of other illnesses. For a diagnosis, consult your healthcare provider at all times.

If you experience any of these signs, consult a doctor:

  1. Itching, burning, swelling, redness, or soreness in the vaginal area.
  2. Sores or lumps in the genital area.
  3. Vaginal discharge with an unpleasant or unusual odor, or of an unusual color. Increased vaginal discharge.
  4. Abnormal vaginal bleeding.
  5. Bleeding after menopause.
  6. Frequent and urgent need to urinate, or a burning sensation during urination. Abnormal vaginal bleeding.

 

GYNECOLOGICAL DISORDERS AND ISSUES

  1. Cervical Dysplasia

This is a condition in which the cervix and its surrounding area develop abnormal or precancerous cells. The cervix, which is the lowest portion of the uterus, is where the vagina opens up.

A Pap test can identify cervical dysplasia (pap smear). A biopsy is used to make the diagnosis. Cells can have minor, moderate, or severe abnormal alterations. Cervical dysplasia does not necessarily indicate cervical cancer. But if the cells are left untreated, they could develop into cancer.

 

Symptoms of Cervical Dysplasia

Most people who have cervical dysplasia or an HPV infection exhibit no symptoms. Usually, symptoms don’t appear until dysplasia develops into cancer. The most effective technique to detect cervical dysplasia before it develops into cancer is routine screening with Pap and HPV testing.

 

Causes of Cervical Dysplasia

Your cervix’s cells can alter over time. This implies that cervical dysplasia can occur at virtually any age.

The main factor causing cervical dysplasia is HPV. More than 200 distinct HPV viruses exist. 40 of these have an impact on the genitalia. Sexual interaction is one way that the diseases are transferred. Cancer risk is generally low for viruses. Twelve are at high risk. About 70% of instances of cervical cancer are caused by the high-risk HPV strains 16 and 18.

The most prevalent sexually transmitted infection in the US is HPV.

 

Your chance of developing cervical dysplasia can be affected by a number of variables, including:

  • Being sexually active before the age of 18
  • Having a lot of sexual partners
  • Being ill or taking medications that impair immunity
  • Smoking or chewing tobacco
  • Not using condoms (although they can help prevent HPV, they can’t completely protect you)
  • Giving birth before the age of 16
  • Not receiving the HPV vaccine

 

  1. Menstrual Disorder

A menstrual disorder is a condition marked by mental and physiological symptoms that revolve around menstruation, usually before or during the period cycle. This could manifest as missed or delayed periods, heavy or light bleeding, excruciating pain, or mood swings.

Over the past few years, menstrual disorders have increased in frequency. Biological, psychological, and environmental components are only a few of the causes of irregular menstruation.

 

Symptoms of Menstrual Disorders

Menstrual disorders can include:

  • Excessive bleeding
  • Mood fluctuations, irritability, melancholy, and anxiety
  • Pain or cramping before or during periods
  • Spotting or very light bleeding
  • Feeling bloated
  • Longer or shorter menstrual cycle

 

Causes of Menstrual Disorders

These are main causes of menstrual disorders:

  • Using an intrauterine device (IUD)
  • Switching birth control methods or using specific medications
  • Exercising excessively
  • Having polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)
  • Being pregnant or nursing
  • Stress
  • Having an overactive (hyperthyroidism) or underactive (hypothyroidism) thyroid gland
  • Uterine fibroids
  • Uterine lining thickening or polyps

 

  1. Pelvic Organ Prolapse

Organs that are prolapsed are those that are drooping or descending. Pelvic organ prolapse is the term used to describe any prolapse or drooping of the pelvic floor organs, such as the:

  • Small intestine
  • Vagina
  • Bladder
  • Uterus
  • Rectum

 

Causes of Pelvic Organ Prolapse

Pelvic organ prolapse can occur as a result of anything that causes more strain on the abdomen. Typical causes include

  • Childbirth, labor, and pregnancy (the most common causes)
  • Obesity
  • Respiratory issues accompanied by a persistent, chronic cough
  • Constipation
  • Cancers of the genitalia
  • Uterus removal by surgery (hysterectomy)

 

Symptoms of Pelvic Organ Prolapse

Others describe the following symptoms along with pelvic organ prolapse, while some women report no symptoms at all:

  • Backache in the low back
  • Pressure or fullness in the pelvic area
  • Painful erections
  • The sensation that something is oozing from the vagina
  • Urinary issues like urine leakage or a persistent urge to urinate
  • Constipation or loss of bowel control
  • Spotting or bleeding from the vagina

 

  1. Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS)

Women who are in their reproductive years are susceptible to developing the hormonal disorder known as polycystic ovarian syndrome, or PCOS. It might have an impact on your capacity to conceive (your doctor will call it your fertility). Additionally, it can cause acne, undesirable body and facial hair, halt your period or make it difficult to estimate when it will come, increase your risk of other health issues including high blood pressure and diabetes, and create acne.

 

Symptoms of Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS)

Missed, irregular, infrequent, or prolonged periods are the most typical PCOS symptoms. Acne, hair growth where it isn’t wanted (like on the face), and hair loss can all be attributed to too much androgen.

Additional signs include:

  • Skin tags or darkened skin in the armpits or on the neck
  • Mood shifts
  • Pelvic pain
  • gaining weight around your midsection

 

Causes of Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS)

All of the causes of PCOS in some women are unknown to doctors.

If your sister or mother also has PCOS, you may be at a higher risk of developing it. It may also be associated with issues that cause your body to create excessive amounts of insulin, which may harm your ovaries and impair their capacity to ovulate (or release eggs)

 

  1. Uterine Fibroids

Muscular tumors that can develop on your uterus are known as uterine fibroids, which your doctor may also refer to as leiomyomas or myomas. They almost seldom become malignant, and having them does not put you at a higher risk of getting uterine cancer.

 

Fibroids can vary widely in size, shape, and location. They could show themselves inside your uterus, on its exterior, or in the uterine wall. They might also attach to your uterus with a stalk- or stem-like structure.

 

Causes of Uterine Fibroids

It is unknown what causes fibroids. Women of reproductive age experience fibroids most frequently. Young ladies without their first period often don’t have them.

 

Symptoms of Uterine Fibroids

  • Excessive or uncomfortable menstrual bleeding (menstruation).
  • Bleeding in between cycles.
  • Bloating or a lower abdominal fullness sensation.
  • Often urinating (this can happen when a fibroid puts pressure on your bladder).
  • Agony when having sex.
  • Back ache
  • Constipation.
  • Persistent vaginal leaking
  • Inability to urinate or empty your bladder.
  • Severe abdominal bloating (enlargement)

 

Is your gynecologist providing you with the best possible care?

When it comes to women’s health, choosing the right gynecologist in Queens can be difficult. There are many factors to consider when choosing an OBGYN, and you want to ensure that you’re comfortable and well taken care of during your visit(s). Here are some quick tips on what to look for in a good Queens gynecologist. As women, we have unique health needs that require specialized care. That’s why it’s important to find an OBGYN who can provide us with the comprehensive care we need. But with so many options out there, how do you choose the right one?

Here are some things to look for:

1) Is this provider part of my insurance network?

2) Does this provider offer after-hours or weekend appointments?

3) What are their credentials and experience (i.e. residency and board certification)?

4) How close is their office to where I live or work?

5) Is this provider friendly and approachable?

6) Do they follow evidence-based practice guidelines and maintain updated equipment?

7) Can I ask any questions without feeling embarrassed or judged?

If you answered yes to all of these questions, then you’ve found yourself a qualified Queens GYNECOLOGIST (OBGYN).

 

What should I expect during my first visit?

Your first visit to a gynecologist can be both exciting and nerve-wracking. Here’s what you can expect:

1) A thorough consultation: Your doctor will ask about your medical history, symptoms, and any concerns you may have.

2) A physical exam: This will likely include a pelvic exam, during which the doctor will check for any abnormalities.

3) Pap smear: A Pap smear is a test that screens for cervical cancer. It is recommended that all women over the age of 21 get one every three years.

4) STD testing: If you are sexually active, your doctor may recommend that you get tested for STDs. However, these tests should not replace regular sexual health screenings if you are not currently sexually active.

5) Birth control options: You may be wondering what birth control option would work best for you. Some considerations include effectiveness, cost, convenience, safety and side effects.

6) Other tests or treatments: As part of your visit to a gynecologist, there may also be other tests or treatments suggested depending on the severity of your condition(s). For example, an ultrasound might need to be done if you experience abdominal pain.

 

Why is some of this stuff so confusing?

You’re not alone if you find some of this information confusing. A lot of it is new and can be hard to understand. The most important thing is that you find a gynecologist who you trust and feel comfortable with. They should be able to answer all of your questions and help you make the best decisions for your health. If they don’t seem like they know what they are talking about, or if they don’t give you enough time, go somewhere else.

 

What are some things I can do to take care of myself before my appointment?

It’s important to take care of yourself both physically and mentally before your appointment. Here are some things you can do:

  1. Get enough sleep the night before so you’re well-rested.
  2. Eat a healthy meal so you’re not feeling faint or nauseous during your appointment.
  3. Drink plenty of water so you’re well-hydrated.
  4. Avoid caffeine or other stimulants prior to your appointment as they can make you feel more anxious.
  5. Take some deep breaths and try to relax; remember that your OBGYN is there to help you and they’ve seen it all before! The most important thing is that you have an open line of communication with them about any questions or concerns you may have about your reproductive health.

EMU OB-GYN Gynecologists Center Queens 8340 Woodhaven Blvd Ste 4 Glendale, NY 11385 (929) 299-6121

 

Radiography & Radiology Explained By A Local Glendale Doctor

The field of radiology uses medical imaging to identify and cure disorders that affect the human body. When German physicist Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen discovered X-rays in 1902, radiology was first used. Since then, radiography has advanced significantly, moving from early films that took hours to prepare to contemporary CT scans that produce in-depth images in minutes. To diagnose or treat a wide range of disorders, imaging techniques including X-ray radiography, ultrasound, computed tomography (CT), nuclear medicine, including positron emission tomography (PET), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are utilized. As new diagnostic and therapeutic techniques are created, the field of radiology continues to develop. In more recent years, radiology has expanded to include diagnosis using an organ-scanning technique that combines the use of radioactive isotopes and nonionizing radiation, such as ultrasound and nuclear magnetic resonance. Similar to how hormones and chemotherapeutic medications are now included in the spectrum of radiotherapy for the treatment of cancer. In this article, a local Glendale, Queens Radiologist will build us a complete picture of everything you need to know about Radiology.

 

WHAT IS RADIOLOGY?

 

Radiology is a branch of medicine that uses medical imaging to diagnose and treat various conditions and diseases. It plays an important role in the medical industry, as it helps doctors to get a better understanding of what is going on inside the human body. The modern practice of radiology involves several different healthcare professionals working as a team.

A physician with the necessary post-graduate training in radiology, a radiologist evaluates medical images, reports his or her findings to other doctors verbally or in writing, and employs imaging to carry out minimally invasive medical operations. The nurse is involved in the treatment of patients both before and after scans or treatments, and this includes administering drugs, keeping an eye on patients who are sedated, and monitoring vital signs. There are numerous forms of radiology, and each one offers a special set of advantages.

WHAT ARE THE DIFFERENT TYPES OF RADIOLOGY?

Radiology is divided into two different areas, diagnostic radiology and interventional radiology. Doctors who specialize in radiology are called radiologists.

  1. DIAGNOSTIC RADIOLOGY: Diagnostic radiography is a subspecialty of medicine that makes use of imaging methods including X-rays, CT scans, and MRIs to make medical diagnoses. These tests’ images can be used to help doctors identify the location and severity of a patient’s injury or sickness and suggest appropriate courses of action. One of the most crucial instruments in contemporary medicine is diagnostic radiology. It aids medical professionals in locating disorders with internal organs including the kidneys, brain, heart, and lungs as well as in spotting anomalies in bones and other tissues.

Diagnostic imaging also gives medical professionals the ability to direct minimally invasive operations that include the insertion of surgical equipment or needles into the body through tiny incisions. Patients’ entire quality of life can be enhanced while also experiencing less pain and a faster rate of recovery. The radiologist or other medical professionals can frequently:

  • diagnose the source of your symptoms using the diagnostic images,
  •  monitor how well your body is responding to a treatment you are receiving for your disease or condition,
  •  and screen for various illnesses like breast cancer, colon cancer, or heart disease.

The most common types of diagnostic radiology exams include:

  • Computerized axial tomography (CAT) scans, usually referred to as computed tomography (CT), which includes CT angiography
  • Fluoroscopy, including barium enema and upper GI
  • Magnetic resonance angiography (MR angiography) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (MRA)
  • Mammography
  • Nuclear medicine, which uses procedures including a thallium cardiac stress test, thyroid scans, and bone scans.
  • Plain radiographs, such as chest radiographs
  • Positron emission tomography, sometimes referred to as PET imaging, PET scanning, or PET-CT when used in conjunction with CT
  • Ultrasound

 

  1. INTERVENTIONAL RADIOLOGY: Medical professionals known as interventional radiologists use imaging techniques like CT, ultrasound, MRI, and fluoroscopy to help direct treatments. When placing catheters, wires, and other tiny equipment and instruments into your body, the doctor can use the imaging to aid. Smaller incisions may usually be made due to this (cuts).

Instead of seeing directly inside your body with a scope (camera) or with open surgery, doctors can utilize this technology to diagnose or treat diseases in nearly any part of the body. In addition to treating back pain, liver issues, renal issues, uterine fibroids, artery and vein obstructions, and malignancies or tumors, interventional radiologists also frequently treat these conditions. No incision, or just a very small one, will be made by the doctor. Rarely is it necessary for you to remain in the hospital after the procedure. In most cases, just mild sedation is necessary (medicines to help you relax).

Interventional radiology techniques include, for instance:

  • Angiography or angioplasty with stent placement
  • Embolization to stop bleeding
  • Cancer treatments such as tumor embolization using chemoembolization or Y-90 radioembolization
  • Tumor ablation with radiofrequency ablation, cryoablation, or microwave ablation
  • Vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty
  • Needle biopsies of various organs, such as the lungs and thyroid gland
  • Breast biopsy, guided either by stereotactic or ultrasound techniques
  • Uterine artery embolization
  • Feeding tube placement
  • Venous access catheter placement, such as ports and PICCs

 

WHAT ARE THE  BENEFITS OF RADIOLOGY?

Radiology is a powerful tool that can be used to diagnose and treat a wide range of medical conditions. Here are 10 reasons why radiology is so important:

  1. Radiology allows doctors to see inside the body without having to perform surgery, which can be dangerous and expensive.
  2. Radiology helps doctors detect early signs of disease, so they can start treatment sooner and prevent the development of more serious conditions.
  3. Radiology reduces the need for invasive procedures that may cause long-term damage or complications, such as catheterization or biopsies.
  4. Radiology helps doctors determine if there are any complications during procedures like surgeries or MRIs/CT scans, so they can adjust their treatment plan accordingly.
  5. Radiology enables doctors to better understand existing diseases so they can make informed decisions about treatment options and work with patients on an individual basis to develop a plan that meets each person’s unique needs (e.g., diet changes).
  6. Radiology helps doctors identify risk factors that could lead to future problems like heart disease or cancer so they can provide guidance on how these issues should be addressed moving forward (e .g., exercise more, eat healthier, stop smoking).
  7. Radiology helps doctors spot potentially dangerous conditions like aneurysms and tumors so they can quickly alert patients before they cause any serious damage to the body.
  8. Radiology allows doctors to work with their patients as they develop treatment plans that will address any issues that have been identified through diagnostic imaging so they can prevent complications from occurring in the future (e.g., radiation oncology).
  9. Radiology is also used to monitor the effectiveness of treatments that have been prescribed by doctors so they can determine if adjustments need to be made for better results.
  10. Finally, radiology helps doctors diagnose problems in the form of cancerous tumors (e .g., breast or prostate) and other conditions that may require early intervention and treatment before they become life-threatening.

 

RADIOGRAPHY

An imaging method called radiography uses X-rays, gamma rays, or other ionizing radiation along with non-ionizing radiation to see an object’s internal structure. Medical radiography (“diagnostic” and “therapeutic”) and industrial radiography are two examples of applications for radiography. Airport security employs similar methods (where “body scanners” generally use backscatter X-ray). In traditional radiography, a beam of X-rays is projected toward the object in order to make an image. Depending on the object’s density and structural makeup, a specific amount of X-rays or other radiation is absorbed by it. A detector is placed behind the object to collect the X-rays that travel through it (either photographic film or a digital detector).

 

DIFFERENCES BETWEEN RADIOGRAPHY AND RADIOLOGY

  1. Radiography is a medical technology, whereas radiology is a specialist area of medicine.
  2. Radiography is the process of creating images of body organs that serve as the foundation for radiologists in the diagnosis and treatment of certain ailments. Radiology is the diagnosis and treatment of diseases.
  3. Radiology requires more time to study because only individuals with a medical degree can pursue a career in it, whereas radiography only requires a high school education.
  4. Radiography makes use of technologies including MRI, ultrasound, mammography, CT scan, x-ray, and nuclear medicine to capture crisp images that are subsequently examined by radiologists.

 

APPLICATIONS OF RADIOLOGY IN HEALTH CARE

Radiology is a field of medicine that deals with the use of X-rays to diagnose and treat health issues. It’s used in many areas of healthcare, including:

  1. Radiation oncology: Radiation therapy kills cancer cells in cancerous tumors to treat them (or shrinking them). By bringing together the most recent findings and advancements in the field, Radiation Oncology offers an open access forum for academics and medical professionals working to manage and treat cancer patients.
  2. Nuclear medicine: To help diagnose specific illnesses, nuclear medicine injects minute amounts of radioactive material into the body (such as heart disease). The natural environment exposes us to ionizing radiation every day, but additional exposures, such as those from nuclear medicine treatments, can modestly raise the chance of acquiring cancer in later life.
  3. Bone densitometry: This examination gauges bone density and can be used to identify osteoporosis. Millions of women are at risk for potentially disabling fractures due to osteoporosis, which causes a considerable reduction in bone mineral density. In order to determine a patient’s fracture risk, we provide bone densitometry, which precisely analyzes bone mineral density (BMD). Our sophisticated method can determine BMD in the wrist, hip, or spine with accuracy. The technique also allows for the measurement of BMD in children.
  4. Radiation therapy: Radiation is used to treat malignant tumors by reducing their size. As a result of its capacity to regulate cell proliferation, radiation treatment is frequently administered to malignant tumors. Ionizing radiation kills cells by destroying the DNA of malignant tissue. Shaped radiation beams are directed from different exposure angles to intersect at the tumor, giving it a considerably higher absorbed dose than the surrounding healthy tissue in order to spare normal tissues.
  5. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI): This is a noninvasive test that creates images of organs and other structures within your body using powerful magnets, radio waves, and computer technology. is a medical imaging technique used in radiology to form pictures of the anatomy and the physiological processes of the body. MRI scanners use strong magnetic fields, magnetic field gradients, and radio waves to generate images of the organs in the body. MRI does not involve X-rays or the use of ionizing radiation,
  6. Computed tomography (CT scan): refers to a computerized x-ray imaging procedure in which a narrow beam of x-rays is aimed at a patient and quickly rotated around the body, producing signals that are processed by the machine’s computer to generate cross-sectional images, or “slices.” These slices are called tomographic images and can give a clinician more detailed information than conventional x-rays.

 

ARE THERE ANY RISKS ASSOCIATED WITH RADIOLOGY?

Radiology is a highly specialized field of medicine that requires extensive training and knowledge to practice safely. The risks associated with radiology are significant, and they must be understood by all medical professionals who work in this field.

The following are some of the most common risks associated with radiology:

  • Exposure to ionizing radiation (X-rays)
  • Exposure to radioactive materials
  • Accidents or mistakes that occur during an examination, such as an incorrect injection or wrong patient identification
  • Injuries from equipment used during the examination (such as broken bones)
  • Injuries from working in a cramped space and moving heavy equipment, such as back injuries
  • Burns or cuts if any part of the body comes into contact with hot equipment or radioactive material during an exam
  • Errors in interpreting the images created by radiological procedures, which could lead to misdiagnosis or improper treatment

 

CONCLUSION

Radiology is an important field in the medical industry. It helps doctors to diagnose and treat patients. There are many different types of radiology, and each has its own unique benefits. Radiologists play a vital role in the medical industry, and they will continue to do so for many years to come. The primary goal of radiology is to create an image that allows a radiologist to discern as much information about a person’s health as possible. This includes identifying any abnormalities or injuries in the body, determining their severity, and recommending treatment plans for patients.


Contributed by: EMU Radiology Center Queens 8340 Woodhaven Blvd Ste 7 Glendale, NY 11385 929-299-6126

 

Ardila to make bid for vacant Assembly seat

Nolan retiring after serving for the last 38 years

BY EVAN TRIANTAFILIDIS

Juan Ardila is running for State Assembly.

The Maspeth native will enter the June 28th Democratic Primary to replace Cathy Nolan, who is retiring after 38 years of service. The 37th District includes the neighborhoods of Long Island City, Maspeth, Ridgewood, and Sunnyside

“Queens residents deserve affordable housing, improved public transit, and a plan to combat climate change,” said Ardila. “Growing up in an immigrant family, I have experienced how important it is to have representation that understands how government can impact our lives.

“In Albany, I will be a champion for our seniors, our workers, and our tenants,” he added. “I am excited for a better future for all New Yorkers.”

Ardila is a first-generation American, the son of a Columbian father and Honduran-Cuban mother. After seeing his mother nearly deported and watching other family members face persecution from gang violence in Honduras, Ardila began his journey to public service.

He earned a B.A. in Political Science from Fordham University and a master’s degree in Public Administration from NYU. He attended St. Adalbert Catholic Academy in Elmhurst before going to high school in Briarwood at Archbishop Molloy High School.

Ardila previously served as a staffer in the office of Brad Lander when he was in the City Council. He also worked at the International Rescue Committee in Manhattan and as a consultant at the city’s Department of Education.

He currently works at the Legal Aid Society.

Last year, Ardila challenged Councilman Robert Holden in the Democratic Primary. He fell 926 votes short of defeating the incumbent, garnering 45 percent of the vote.

Ardila’s Assembly bid has already earned the endorsements of State Senator Jessica Ramos, Assemblywoman Catalina Cruz, and Councilwoman Jennifer Gutierrez.

“Juan draws on his experience in providing legal representation for all New Yorkers, and will bring his unwavering dedication to listen to working families,” said Ramos, “to organize his community around key priorities such as housing infrastructure, increased access to public transportation, and a more inclusive public education system.”

Ardila’s also has the backing of Make the Road Action and Churches United for Fair Housing Action.

“Juan Ardila is a fighter for his community who has stood with immigrant, LatinX, Black, and working-class members of his community in the fight for respect and dignity,” said Theo Oshiro, co-executive director of Make the Road Action. “We were proud to support him before, and we’re proud to support him again.”

104th Precinct Police Blotter

Monday, Feb. 7
Zamiqua Miller was arrested at 329 Wyckoff Avenue for petit larceny by Detective Wright.
Zamiqua Miller was arrested at 64-02 Catalpa Avenue for burglary by Detective Gerardi.
Lychena E. Solomon was arrested at 690 Onderdonk Avenue for misdemeanor assault by Officer Arfeen.

Tuesday, Feb. 8
Janneth Guaman was arrested at 57-66 79th Street for possession of a forged instrument by Detective Wright.
Andy Morla was arrested at Fresh Pond Road and Eliot Avenue for possession of a forged instrument by Officer Shariff.

Wednesday, Feb. 9
Fernando Rodriguez was arrested at 65-04 Hull Avenue for criminal mischief by Detective Lodato.
Roman A. Vera Delgado was arrested at Tonsor Street and Metropolitan Avenue for aggravated unlicensed operator by Officer Arfeen.
Kelius Casete was arrested at Catala Avenue and Fresh Pond Road for aggravated unlicensed operator by Officer Martinez.

Thursday, Feb. 10
Derrick Randall was arrested at 78-16 Cooper Avenue for felony assault by Detective Bublin.
Gary Montague was arrested at 57-44 80th Street for grand larceny by Detective Moon.

Friday, Feb. 11
James McRory was arrested at 84-45 Fleet Court for strangulation by Office malik.
Segunda Sisa Pilamunga was arrested at Decatur Street and Cypress Avenue for driving while intoxicated by Officer Cedenopilier.
Luis Vargas was arrested at Wyckoff Avenue and Myrtle Avenue for suspended registration by Officer Nicacci.
Keily Araceli-Otero was arrested at 71-30 73rd Street for burglary by Officer Lyle.

Saturday, Feb. 12
Craig L. Capers was arrested at Forest Avenue and Myrtle Avenue for aggravated unlicensed operator by Officer Armond.
Hugo Reyes Cardenas was arrested at 65-09 Metropolitan Avenue for criminal mischief by Officer Bawa.
Victor Espirito was arrested at 62nd Street and Cooper Avenue for possession of a forged instrument by Detective Wright.
Jairo Paguay was arrested at 281 Saint Nicholas for third-degree assault by Officer Claybrooks.
Jeffrey Tavarez Florentino was arrested at Vermont Place and Jackie Robinson Parkway for aggravated unlicensed operator by Officer Bistany.
Rose Estrella was arrested at 281 Saint Nicholas for criminal mischief by Officer Claybrooks.

Sunday, Feb. 13
Jeremiah Banks was arrested at 903 Wyckoff Avenue for criminal contempt by Detective Rochford.
Jonathan Tyson was arrested at Grandview Avenue and Grove Street for possession of a forged instrument by Officer Griffin.
Josee De Jesus was arrested at Stephen Street and Cypress Avenue for possession of a forged instrument by Officer Pickett.
Diego Nunez was arrested at 68-17 Forest Avenue for criminal contempt by Officer Christoldoulo.
Angie Aguirre was arrested at 68-17 Forest Avenue for criminal mischief by Officer Christoldoulo.

The Simple Truth: The campaign to stop PTSD and Cancer from killing our Veterans

I hope everyone had a happy and healthy 4th of July. Now that our national birthday party is over until next year, we must all again focus on saving the lives of our Veterans at risk. As we enjoy our summer rituals of beaches, barbecues, travel, and other recreational activities, let us make sure that those who make those traditions possible, also get to enjoy them.

We Veterans are the smallest minority group in our population, yet we suffer from the dual epidemics of cancer and suicide at much higher rates than civilians. The reasons for this are many, but the solution is simple. The solution is: The Gold Shield. Most people are shocked and offended when they learn that almost every hour of every day, another Veteran is lost to suicide, and an even greater number are lost to cancer, and those tragic numbers are directly caused by military service.

To make matters worse, the government does little to improve the situation. Since the government cannot solve the problem, it is up to us – the private sector. The Gold Shield is the mechanism we all can use to deliver services Vets need to reduce their appalling death toll. It is tragic when we lose any service member on the battlefield – but it is UNFORGIVABLE TO KEEP ON LOSING THEM AT HOME.

Read more: Glendale Register – The Simple Truth The campaign to stop PTSD and Cancer from killing our Veterans

Hands off Haiti! The U.S. has done enough

An Associated Press headline on July 8 read, “Biden with few options to stabilize Haiti in wake of slaying.” Following the assassination of president Jovenel Moïse, AP reports, “the U.S. is unlikely to deploy troops.”

Nonetheless, the American political and media establishments seem to blithely assume that Haiti’s internal affairs are very much America’s business. State Department spokesman Ned Price said “It is still the view of the United States that elections this year should proceed.”

An “electoral timetable” proposed by Moïse was “backed by the Biden administration, though it rejected plans to hold a constitutional referendum.”

Imagine, for a moment, that Russian president Vladimir Putin announced his support for the U.S. holding 2022 congressional midterm elections, but denounced a proposed constitutional amendment.

Haven’t American politicians spent the last several years kvetching about supposed “Russian meddling” in U.S. elections? Is there some particular reason why “election interference” is bad when others do it to us, but good when we do it to others?

The United States has intervened in Haiti’s internal affairs for more than 200 years, almost always with poor results for both countries’ populations.

After Haiti’s slave population rose up and overthrew their French masters, Federalists led by Alexander Hamilton recognized Toussaint Louverture’s new regime and encouraged independence. (Louverture maintained the colonial relationship with France until 1804.)

Under Thomas Jefferson, the U.S. withdrew that diplomatic recognition under pressure from slave owners who feared a spread of Louverture’s rebellion to the American mainland, and refused to recognize Haiti’s independence until 1862.

Subsequently, Washington intervened militarily in Haiti multiple times, occupied the country from 1915 to 1934, and supported the dictatorships of Francois “Papa Doc” and Jean-Claude “Baby Doc” Duvalier from 1957 to 1986 on the Cold War logic that Haiti could be a Caribbean “counterweight” to Communist Cuba.

Since the fall of the younger Duvalier, the U.S. government has continued to intervene in Haitian affairs, dangling and withdrawing aid, engaging in economic blockade, and intercepting and repatriating U.S.-bound refugees, based on who’s in charge in Port-au-Prince and whether they toe Washington’s line.

While it’s simplistic to conclude that the US government is responsible for all of Haiti’s many problems, Washington certainly bears a great deal of responsibility for those problems. The way forward and out of that culpability is less, not more, interference in Haiti’s affairs.

If the U.S. government really needs a “Haiti policy,” that policy should include two elements: free trade and welcoming refugees. Beyond that, hands off Haiti!

Thomas L. Knapp is director at the William Lloyd Garrison Center for Libertarian Advocacy

Read more: Glendale Register – Hands off Haiti The U S has done enough

Staying healthy while traveling

The benefits of travel are enumerable, and I’m seeing many social media posts from friends and family who are venturing back onto planes and trains this summer. However, as anyone who has traveled in the past 10 years knows, travel has always had its downsides, even pre-pandemic.

Read more: Glendale Register – Staying healthy while traveling

What increases the risk of catching a virus or infection during air and train travel?

Surprisingly, it’s not what you may think. Most people tend to focus on the air quality. While it’s true that infections can be spread through air droplets, a plane’s air is actually filtered more than a movie theater’s or sporting event venue’s.

According to a study in 2007 by Charles Gerba, professor of environment microbiology at the University of Arizona, it’s the surfaces on the airplane that create the greatest risk of picking up bacteria and viruses. The surfaces that harbor the most microbial pathogens are tray tables, bathrooms, and seats – especially arm rests.

Read more: Glendale Register – Staying healthy while traveling

If you could avoid contact with your face after touching the surfaces on an airplane, you could significantly reduce transmission. However, it is almost impossible not to touch your face.

In medical school, during one lab, the professor put a powder that could only be seen with UV lighting on our books. At the end of class, the professor used an ultraviolet light and confirmed that everyone had touched their face at least once – and most of us repeatedly.

Preventing viruses and infections

The most reasonable approach is to carry antimicrobial wipes to clean the surfaces of the hand rests and tray tables. Wash your hands after using the bathroom. Use hand sanitizers before you eat. You might also put a napkin over the tray table to avoid touching the surface.

Fortunately, most infections are not life-threatening, but rather a short-term inconvenience.

Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) risks

More serious is a DVT, which is also referred to as “economy class syndrome,” because it occurs most often when sitting for long periods of time in cramped spaces. The risk of a DVT is increased by as much as two to four times on long-haul flights.

DVTs are more likely for travelers who have other risk factors, such as obesity, heart failure, cancer, increased age or recent major surgery. A 2001 New England Journal of Medicine study found that flights greater than 3600 miles cause increased risk of a DVT and PE. This limits the risk to mostly international flights and those traveling from the east coast to Hawaii. Unfortunately, DVTs and PEs can be life-threatening, if untreated.

Prevention of DVTs

When on a flight of more than five hours, make sure you walk or move around every one to two hours. Hydration is also critical to decrease clot risk. Another easy solution is below the knee compression stockings, which have been shown to decrease risk dramatically.

What about the role of stress?

Travel increases stress for many. Acute stress tends to increase the risk of hypercoagulability, or clots, and thus the risk of cardiovascular disease.

Chronic stress may also cause people to be more susceptible to infection, including the common cold.

Biofeedback, which involves deep breathing and meditation, is a great way to reduce both chronic and acute stress while traveling.

Though there are no guarantees, take these precautions to minimize the risks of infection, DVT/PE and increased stress. Also, take it to heart the next time you hear the captain and flight attendants tell you to sit back, relax and enjoy the trip.

Read more: Glendale Register – Staying healthy while traveling

EMU Health Helping to Raise Awareness About HPV and Cervical Cancer

By Burlington Tifa

January is Cervical Health Awareness Month and EMU Health of Glendale is working to insure that those who may be susceptible know the preventative measures that can be taken. 

Cervical cancer has become increasingly preventable through vaccinations for the human papillomavirus (HPV) and screening tests for HPV and pap smears.

Yet, there is still increased awareness and action needed to fight this very common virus. 

In fact, 45 percent of men ages 18 to 59, and 40 percent of women ages 18 to 59 are infected with HPV – some 79 million Americans.  

“About 70% of cervical cancer cases are caused by HPV but the majority of those infected won’t develop cancer,” says Dr. Zoya Gavrilman, an obstetrician and gynecologist at EMU Health in Glendale,Queens. 

When you schedule your pap smear at EMU Health, your gynecologist will take a sample of your cervical cells to facilitate the screening. Testing for HPV doesn’t require a separate appointment. 

Vaccination, regular women’s health screenings, quitting smoking and practicing safe sex are among the preventative measures that can be taken against HPV.  

To schedule your appointment with Dr. Gavrilman, or any of the other practices based out of EMU Health, call (929) 264-7733 or visit emuhealth.com

A message from EMU Health Gynecologist: October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month

According to the American Cancer Society, by the end of 2020, an estimated 239,190 new cases of invasive breast cancer will have been diagnosed in women, and about 65,960 new cases of carcinoma in situ (CIS – non-invasive and the earliest form of breast cancer) will have been diagnosed. With these estimates in mind, a woman currently has a 1 in 8 chance of developing breast cancer in her lifetime. These statistics continue to make breast cancer the most common cancer among women, second only to skin cancer.

As October ushers in Breast Cancer Awareness Month, it’s a great time to take stock of our knowledge of this disease and its risks and symptoms. But at EMU Health in Glendale, Queens, we also believe that awareness is more than just a month. It’s about staying informed and helping you take the right steps to fight breast cancer, including early detection through annual mammograms. But first, let’s have a quick refresher on the basics of breast cancer. 

How does it start?
Put simply, breast cancer is caused by a genetic abnormality. Only a very small percentage (5-10 percent) of breast cancers come from an abnormality that you inherit from your mother or father. The vast majority are caused by abnormalities that come from general aging and wear and tear on the body. In fact, aging is probably the largest risk factor for breast cancer, with most breast cancers found in women age 50 and up. Other risks include a family history of breast cancer, a lack of physical activity and excess weight or obesity after menopause. Most women have some risk factors, including younger women (women under 45 account for roughly 11 percent of all new breast cancer cases in the U.S.).

How do I know if I have it?
Breast cancer symptoms can vary from person to person. Warning signs include:

  • New lump in the breast or underarm
  • Thickening or swelling of part of the breast
  • Irritation or dimpling of breast skin
  • Redness or flaky skin on the breast
  • Pain or pulling in of the nipple area
  • Nipple discharge other than breast milk, including blood
  • Any change in the size or shape of the breast
  • Pain in any area of the breast

It’s important to remember that these symptoms can also be caused by conditions other than cancer, and some people diagnosed with breast cancer have no symptoms at all. That’s why early detection is so essential to fighting the disease as effectively as possible.

Annual mammograms and reducing your risk
Early detection is key to fighting breast cancer, and can lead to an easier treatment plan. And one of the best methods of early detection is an annual mammogram. A mammogram is a simple, routine screening that helps detect breast cancer earlier than waiting for symptoms to appear. Regular mammograms are recommended for women 40 years of age and older. If you are at higher risk for breast cancer, you may need to begin regular mammograms sooner. It’s a good idea to talk with your doctor about your risks and the most appropriate time for you to get started with mammograms.

In addition to annual mammograms for early detection, there are proactive things you can do to help lower your risk for breast cancer, including regular exercise, adequate sleep, healthy eating, limited alcohol intake and avoidance of chemicals that can cause cancer.

While breast cancer can be a scary proposition, scheduling an annual mammogram to aid in early detection and living a healthy lifestyle to help reduce your risk can give you the peace of mind that comes from staying on top of your breast health.

If you would like to schedule a mammogram or talk with a doctor about your breast health, EMU Health can help. Call (718) 850-4368 and EMU will connect you with their featured provider, Dr. Zoya Gavrilman.

Dr. Zoya Gavrilman is a dedicated obstetrician and gynecologist, practicing at EMU Health in Glendale,Queens. Patients visit her for a variety of reasons including pelvic pain, dyspareunia, and hysteroscopy. During her consultations, she actively invests in providing her patients with the necessary information regarding healthcare.

Dr. Gavrilman earned her bachelor’s degree from the University of Michigan. She obtained her medical degree from Wayne State University. She completed a residency in obstetrics, gynecology, and reproductive science at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Mount Sinai West. She is a member of the American College of Physicians and a junior fellow of the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

Fill the Form for Events, Advertisement or Business Listing