Keynote speaker, criminal defense lawyer and television personality Rikki Klieman addresses honorees
Keynote speaker, criminal defense lawyer and television personality Rikki Klieman addresses honorees
slideshow
Beep holds expo featuring women-owned businesses
by Holly Bieler
Mar 31, 2015 | 38 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Keynote speaker, criminal defense lawyer and television personality Rikki Klieman addresses honorees
Keynote speaker, criminal defense lawyer and television personality Rikki Klieman addresses honorees
slideshow
Female business owners from across the borough sold everything from homemade cards to body lotion at Borough Hall on Monday, as Borough President Eric Adams hosted a women-owned business expo in celebration of Women’s History Month. “I figured this would be a good place to display my business, get the word out,” said Dawn Jones, who owns the small business DJ’s Card Creator. “I do this on the side, but I would love to do this full-time.” After the expo, the borough president held a ceremony honoring 16 female leaders in Brooklyn. He recounted a significant moment from his childhood, when a car of women drove up to his apartment with bags of groceries one Sunday when his mother couldn’t afford to feed his family. When he looked through the boxes of food, Adams said, he realized all the boxes were only half full. “The women didn’t have the means to buy groceries,” he said. “But they gave us half of what they had, went into their own cupboards and divided to make sure we were able to have enough to carry us over for another week. That is my relationship with the women of this city. They have often in a very dignified manner moved this city to a compassionate place.” The night’s keynote speaker, criminal defense lawyer and television personality Rikki Klieman, said that it was a woman’s job to forge a path of success not just for themselves, but for future generations of women as well. “No one is going to remember you when you go because of the hours that you worked,” she said. “No one is going to remember you because of the money that you made. But they will remember you for the contributions that you made. “Teach a child,” she continued. “Teach an adult to read. Do something each day that makes you give service to humanity. You have a responsibility to all of the women who follow you.” After the keynote address, the borough president honored female leaders across a wide variety of arenas. Dalia Shusterman and Perl Wolfe, who together make up the Crown Heights Hasidic alternative band Bulletproof Stockings, and who adhere to the prohibition of kol isha by performing to exclusively female audiences, said they were taken aback by the praise they had received since they founded the band three years ago. “It totally caught us by surprise, “ said Wolfe, vocalist and keyboardist in the band. “We’re musicians, we didn’t think it would reach this far. To be honored by the borough president, that’s pretty awesome. And it's really awesome that women are responding in so many different places, so many different mediums.” Honoree Pamela Esposito-Amery, CEO and co-founder of T.E.A.L., a foundation that promotes ovarian cancer awareness, said the celebration felt especially poignant as a born-and-bred Brooklynite. “It’s great being honored with this group of women,” she said. “I was born and raised in Brooklyn, so this is a proud moment.”
Comments
(0)
Comments-icon Post a Comment
No Comments Yet
Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito makes charoset with council members Mark Levine and Karen Koslowitz and Food Bank COO Lisa Hines-Johnson and Masbia chef Ruben Diaz.
Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito makes charoset with council members Mark Levine and Karen Koslowitz and Food Bank COO Lisa Hines-Johnson and Masbia chef Ruben Diaz.
slideshow
Masbia Soup Kitchen to distribute 25,000 Passover meals
by Holly Bieler
Mar 31, 2015 | 74 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito makes charoset with council members Mark Levine and Karen Koslowitz and Food Bank COO Lisa Hines-Johnson and Masbia chef Ruben Diaz.
Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito makes charoset with council members Mark Levine and Karen Koslowitz and Food Bank COO Lisa Hines-Johnson and Masbia chef Ruben Diaz.
slideshow
Elected officials visited the Masbia Soup Kitchen in Rego Park on Monday, as the kitchen, partnering with the Food Bank for New York City for the first time, geared up to distribute kosher meals across the city for the Passover holiday. “Some families don’t have the money to observe the holidays,” said Councilwoman Karen Koslowitz. “We need to help them out. This will enable families to celebrate a tradition that has been observed through the centuries.” She said that Masbia served a profound need in her community, not just during holidays but throughout the year. “Every Thursday, when families wait to take home packages for over the weekend, the line goes around the block,” she said. Masbia itself will be distributing 25,000 kosher meals alone as part of its annual Charoset Drive. Alexander Rapaport, executive director of Masbia, said that the holidays presented an added financial burden to roughly one in four Jewish families in New York City who face economic hardship. “The need is so great,” he said “We don’t even try to close public schools on snow days, because children won’t have somewhere to go eat. We now have two weeks of vacation for lots of kids on government-subsidized breakfast and lunch, which creates a big burden for families in addition to the burden of the holidays, which includes a festive meal.” Elected officials packed some boxes of food on Monday, and prepared charoset, a traditional Seder dish. Councilman Mark Weprin said the City Council had been working increasingly to help support food banks as more and more families rely on them. “We’ve done a lot of funding for food banks throughout the city,” he said. “So many New Yorkers are in need of food and other supplies for their lives.” Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito said that the need for food pantries was growing in the wake of federal funding cuts of food stamps. “We’re unfortunately seeing an incredible need and it’s just growing,” she said. “Federal cuts have lessened the opportunity to get food stamps, so these kinds of locations become essential as a way of helping sustain families. But that puts a strain on our local resources and service organizations.” She said that she hoped the City Council could combat the growing need for food banks by working with the mayor to help secure funding for organizations such as Masbia. “We need to figure out as a municipality how we help them,” she said. “We can’t just abandon them.”
Comments
(0)
Comments-icon Post a Comment
No Comments Yet
Locals met with Marvel and BPL reps to discuss library plans
Locals met with Marvel and BPL reps to discuss library plans
slideshow