Councilman Ruben Wills and residents discuss the relocation of sex offenders from the Skyway Shelter in South Ozone Park.
Councilman Ruben Wills and residents discuss the relocation of sex offenders from the Skyway Shelter in South Ozone Park.
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Queens shelter to lose sex offenders
by Francesca Campione
Jul 07, 2015 | 187 views | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Councilman Ruben Wills and residents discuss the relocation of sex offenders from the Skyway Shelter in South Ozone Park.
Councilman Ruben Wills and residents discuss the relocation of sex offenders from the Skyway Shelter in South Ozone Park.
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South Ozone Park residents on Tuesday celebrated the long-awaited relocation of registered sex offenders living in the Skyway Homeless Shelter on South Conduit Avenue. In 2011, the shelter, which originally served homeless families, was converted to a men’s shelter. According to Councilman Ruben Wills, at times it housed upwards of 50 registered sex offenders. “This was a long, hard battle. It was warranted, it was necessary,” said Wills. “Today, the Department of Homeless Services announced that this is not a compliant shelter and that they will be removing the sexual offenders in an expedited service.” New York State law requires that registered sex offenders live further than 1,000 feet from a school or other facilities that care for children. The Department of Homeless Services (DHS) assured concerned residents that Skyway met the legal requirement. But after hiring an outside company, Wills discovered that the distance from shelter door to the door of PS 124, on the corner of 130th Street, was over 1,000 feet, but the distance between the property lines was only 919.53 feet. “This is not a NIMBY issue,” Wills said. “Sex offenders levels 2 and 3 should not be in anybody’s backyard, that’s what the issue is.” According to Debbie Capuano, past PTA president of the school, parents and staff were willing to live with a family shelter. “We had no problems when it was a family shelter,” she said, adding that the children in the shelter benefitted from the services at PS 124. “This was their only safe ground. This was where they came for their meals, and they were moved so quick.”
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Searching Woodhaven for a father
by Ed Wendell
Jul 07, 2015 | 192 views | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend | print
There is an answer out there somewhere, quite possibly right here in Woodhaven, and Adam Maiello hopes to find it. Simply put, Adam is looking for his father. Adam Maiello was born at Jamaica Hospital in April 1980. His mother, Rose Marie Maiello, is from Woodhaven and lived in Ozone Park at the time of his birth. As for his father, there are a few leads, but no hard facts. “He is probably somewhere between 55 to 60 years old,” Maiello guesses. At different times, he’s heard that his name might be Joe or Frank or even Jerry. His mother told him that she and her father were to be married but that he’d had an “electrical accident” and that when he recovered, he said he would not be able to take care of two children. “I’ve always wanted to know who my biological father was,” Maiello told me last Friday on our weekly web-based radio show. And in an effort to find that man, Maiello has taken to social media, posting a picture of himself holding a sign containing all of the basic facts. He has also been doing research on Ancestry.com and taken a DNA test through that service which has led to several intriguing leads, but nothing that has panned out yet. “I’d love to have a relationship with the man, but I realize that I am 35 years old and there’s a possibility that he doesn’t know I exist,” he said. “Something like this, popping up out of the blue, could be damaging to someone’s current life.” Maiello has no desire for that to happen. “Honestly, I’d just be happy with a name and a picture, just to see what traits I got from him,” he said. On a practical level, a medical level, it could be very important to know your family history and to know your background. But from an emotional standpoint, it's something that many of us take for granted, knowing our history, knowing how and why we came to be. There’s a fairly good chance that Maiello’s father is out there right now and reading this article in the paper or maybe online. So I asked Maiello, if he could address his father directly, what he would like him to know about his son. “I would like him to know that I’m a self-made man and I am not looking for any handouts,” Maiello replied. “There’s no hidden agenda. I’d just like a picture of him, know a bit about him. I’d love to have a relationship with him, but if that’s not possible, that’s totally understandable.” And if I might add, having spoken to Maiello a few times, I can tell you that he’s a nice guy, he’s got his head on straight and that you’d be proud to call him your son. And so, by putting this all of this out there we hope that someone who knew Rose Marie Maiello in the late 1970s or early 1980s knows the story behind Maiello’s birth and is willing to help him resolve the mystery of his father’s identity. You can contact him directly via email at findmybiodad1980@yahoo.com (no hyphens) or you can always contact me at projectwoodhaven@gmail.com and we’ll pass along any information you might have. Somewhere out there, in Woodhaven or Ozone Park or somewhere beyond, sits the person or persons who can help Maiello. And quite possibly, that person is Maiello’s father. We hope that this story has a happy ending. On an unrelated note, we’ll be back at the historic Wyckoff-Snedicker Family Cemetery (96th Street and 86th Avenue behind All Saints Church) this Saturday morning. We do need volunteers for some light work, such raking leaves, collecting rocks, etc. We work from 9 a.m. to noon, but if you can only give us an hour of your time, we’ll take it. We are in the midst of restoring something unique and special here in Woodhaven and you are welcome to be a part of it.
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A clipping of "Miracle of Jan August," 1948, Long Island Daily Press.
A clipping of "Miracle of Jan August," 1948, Long Island Daily Press.
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