M. L. Kagan
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September 27, 2016
Having grown up in Forest Hills even went to Forest Hills High. Just what the neighborhood needs more condos I bet the news owners are chomping at the bit to demolish the Midway all developers see are Dollar Signs. They say the are not going to develop soon watch in six months to a year the Midway will be toast. This is what we call progress. People just don't give a crap. Like lemmings to the slaughter.
lennychristofer
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September 26, 2016
One step further. Jim has homes, mixed use buildings, warehouses, and apartment buildings for sale. Full time since 1979, and experience that makes dealing with him so much easier. Some companies have open houses, two agents sitting in front of home, listing agent arrives hours later, and hardly anyone goes to the open houses, Why? They have the house not at a proper selling level. They just care about getting the exclusive listing, and figure they can reduce it as time goes by. People give out of neighborhood Realtors their home to sell, why I do not know. Maybe they throw high prices the owners want to hear. I have dealt with jim over 20 years and he is very good at what he does.
Officials announce new ferry landing on LIC waterfront
by Benjamin Fang
Sep 23, 2016 | 1247 views | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend | print
A rendering of the ferry stop at Gantry Plaza State Park, expected to open summer 2017.
A rendering of the ferry stop at Gantry Plaza State Park, expected to open summer 2017.
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Elected and city officials and community leaders at the Monday announcement.
Elected and city officials and community leaders at the Monday announcement.
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By next summer, the expanded citywide ferry service will be making stops in Astoria, Hunters Point and now Gantry State Plaza Park. Elected and city officials announced Monday afternoon that the Long Island City waterfront will add another ferry landing to accommodate the fast-growing residential community. The citywide system and the new dock are expected to launch in the summer of 2017. “This is one of the fastest growing communities in all of New York City, one of the most desirable communities to live in,” said Councilman Jimmy Van Bramer. “Therefore, there are certain pressures that get placed on the transportation infrastructure. Getting to and from Manhattan and other parts of the city become increasingly important.” With ferries becoming an increasingly popular mode of transportation, Van Bramer said, adding an addition landing will offer yet another way for people to get around the city. “Few rides are as pleasant as the ferry service along the East River. It is quick, efficient and it works,” he said. “That’s why it’s incredibly important that we expand the network.” The city so far has invested $55 million for 10 new landings alone, officials said. According to Maria Torres-Springer, president of the city’s Economic Development Corporation (EDC), which is leading the charge for citywide ferry service, each ride will cost the same as a Metrocard swipe. With the city rapidly growing, especially along waterfront communities, Torres-Springer said she projects the Long Island City landing will have the highest ridership outside of Manhattan, with nearly 4,000 trips daily. “It’s going to be a lifeline vital to the thousands of residents who live in the dense residential corridors becoming even more dense,” she said. “What that means for the thousands of people taking those trips is for a cost of a subway ride, an easy, affordable, convenient, modern connections to other parts of the city.” Through the ferry expansion, the system plans to have a total of 21 landings and six routes by the end of 2017. Those routes include ones in Astoria, the Rockaways and South Brooklyn. By 2018, the city plans to start new routes on the Lower East Side and Soundview in the Bronx. The ferry service will be operated by the company Hornblower. Assemblywoman Cathy Nolan said she previously had concerns about the loss of parkland due to this ferry dock. After working with EDC, the state Parks Department and government officials, they came to a “good compromise,” she said. “With the developments of these gigantic, dense buildings and the high towers, we need as much open space in Long Island City we promised people all those years ago,” she said. “I’ll be looking carefully to make sure it’s not environmentally [unfriendly] or, in an open space way, hurts the existing parkland that we have.” State Senator Michael Gianaris celebrated the new ferry landing as a way to accommodate the thousands of new residents coming into the community. “This is a welcome bit of relief,” he said. “It’s something many of us have been calling for for a very long time.”
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Governor honors LIC drama teacher with excellence award
by Benjamin Fang
Sep 22, 2016 | 649 views | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Left to right: State Senator Michael Gianaris, UFT President Michael Mulgrew, Jamie Cacciola-Price, Governor Andrew Cuomo, Frank Sinatra School Principal Donna Finn, Councilman Jimmy Van Bramer and Assemblywoman Aravella Simotas.
Left to right: State Senator Michael Gianaris, UFT President Michael Mulgrew, Jamie Cacciola-Price, Governor Andrew Cuomo, Frank Sinatra School Principal Donna Finn, Councilman Jimmy Van Bramer and Assemblywoman Aravella Simotas.
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New York State honored a drama teacher from the Frank Sinatra School of the Arts last Friday for inspiring his students and his dedication to arts education. Jamie Cacciola-Price, who teaches advanced acting techniques, musical theatre, playwriting and directing at the Long Island City high school, was one of 61 teachers out of 200,000 statewide to receive the award. The Empire State Excellence in Teaching Award also comes with a $5,000 stipend. Overcome with emotion, Cacciola-Price thanked his students for being his inspiration. “I am so fortunate to be able to share my passion with you each and every day,” he said. “Coming to work is an absolute joy.” Governor Andrew Cuomo presented the award to Cacciola-Price. Cuomo’s mother was a teacher, which he said helped him recognize the importance of having skilled educators in the classroom. “That’s why rewarding teachers, appreciating teachers is so very important. It’s something we have not done enough of, frankly,” Cuomo said. “We talk about funding and tests and evaluations, we don’t say the talent and drive of the teacher is the most important.” Cacciola-Price has taught at Frank Sinatra since 2013. Before coming to the school, the arts educator was an actor, director, playwright, choreographer, costume designer and set designer. According to Cuomo, Cacciola-Price used to travel to schools that couldn’t afford an arts program and designed a program for them. He also worked with homeless LGBT youth at Sylvia’s Place, a facility in Manhattan. Cacciola-Price is now pursuing his doctorate at New York University’s Steinhardt School. He thanked Cuomo for choosing an arts educator to be included in the list of the state’s top teachers. “Often times as an arts educator, you have to justify your purpose. In some schools, they don’t have drama programs or music programs,” he said. “The fact that you’ve taken the time to honor a drama teacher means the world to me and the students in this room.” He recounted meeting Cuomo once at a 2011 rally during the state’s passage of the marriage equality law, where he shook the governor’s hand. “As a person who is gay and there are students in this room who are also gay, that legislation has made a huge difference in my life and will certainly matter to them,” he said. “Maybe not now, but maybe in a few years.” In front of a large group of students, Cacciola-Price said his drama classes teach students how to analyze, research and understand the human experience. Students become well versed in “issues of injustice in our society,” he said, including LGBT issues, homelessness, gentrification and other social justice issues. They explore all of these subjects while improving their crafts as actors, director, designers and writers. Cacciola-Price directs four productions per season. He and the students spend up to three hours after school and all day on Saturdays to put on the plays. “The reason I do this is because of all of you who are here,” he said to the students. “It is never a chore, it is always a pleasure. The reason for that is all of you.” The governor was praised by both Principal Donna Finn and UFT president Michael Mulgrew for the $24.8 billion state investment in education in last year’s budget. They both also held up the arts school as an elite, one-of-a-kind public school in New York. “This is a school that’s a shining example that when you engage students, when they want to be in their school everyday, when they’re learning things that make them happy, they’re going to learn and perform and do great things in life,” Mulgrew said. “Education is not just about the test or your subjects that you go to class for. Education is about building you as a whole person.” Cuomo proudly boasted on Friday about the state’s $2 billion investment in new technology in schools, in addition to new buildings and funding for other programs. “We spend more per student in this state than any state in the United States of America,” he said, “and we’re very proud of that.”
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